Meet the Neu-Media Studio

High quality virtual programs that bridge the gap between home and Neu-Life.

studio 1How will we reach our youth to continue the great work we do...during a pandemic? A question Neu-Life Executive Director, Jody Rhodes, considered when the whole country was put in lockdown back in March. Virtual programming was a no brainer, but how do we reach our youth in accessible ways? 

In this post, we will discuss our approach to virtual engagement, continuous learning, some of our successes, and how we plan to expand our capacity to reach our youth;  bridging  the gap between Neu-Life and home to keep their support system in tact.

What is Neu-Media Studio, and why did we need it?

The concept of Neu-Media began when the  surge of Covid-19 shut down the city, keeping youth at home and forcing our staff to work remotely to maintain the support system our families depend on. We quickly discovered limitations and needed a way to adapt our reach to our youth, to more effectively bridge the gap between Neu-Life and home. We needed resources. Youth needed the tech technology like laptops with webcams, and we needed an organized but flexible program that adapted to them wherever they were at.

Out of that, Neu-Media was born; A studio equipped with professional recording gear, mics, cameras, control station, green-screen backdrops and studio lighting. A place where Neu-Life staff pre-record or live broadcast virtual programming such as Farmfork, LifeSkills, Making Proud Choices, and Virtual TOP.

With covid, we realized how challenging it was to engage with Neu-Life youth. Wweren't set up for online programming," says Executive Director, Jody Rhodes. "The only way we had to contact youth at the time was through phone calls and text check-ins.  We encouraged them to do their school work and incentivized our IXL math program, but we weren't set up for meaningful online programming. So I went to Misha Seigfried to discuss what it would it take to get our programming online. It was important for us to maintain high quality programming beyond check-ins on zoom or google classrooms. That’s where the idea for the studio came into play.

How does it work?

Jody quickly got to work in April, writing grants to invest in equipment and technology that both Neu-Life staff and youth would need to make Neu-Media virtual programming a reality. Studio construction started in July and since then, staff have produced a variety of engaging programming for Neu-Life youth and keep them connected to the support system that Neu-life provides. A recent success was the live broadcast of the Annual Youth Summit.

The next phase of the program will offer youth opportunities in community activism, organizing and social justice issues while learning to powerfully use video and new media production skillsParticipants will alternate between roles such as director, host, audio, and camera. They’ll collaborate to develop their ideas with pre-production worksheets that develop the script and“live” timelines for a broadcast or recording.

"Were paying them for the opportunity to get their hands on tech and skills that won't cost them an arm and a leg to access lucrative careers.” - Misha Seigfried, Studio Manager

Green Bay Packers Give Back invested the first $10,000 in Neu-Media Studio to help with the laptops and other technology to distribute to Neu-Life youthWith a few month's worth of virtual programming behind us, we're working to better our best, improve our programming and importantly, expand support and partnerships to sustain and grow this critical safety net for Neu-Life youth.

First, we identified the needthen we found funding, built a lab that's usable, workable and engaging and we launched it. Looking forward, we now know that well need more studio equipment and that we plan to integrate studio production into Neu-Life programs – workgroups that benefit from the lab could include video and music production, marketing and social media engagement etc. It’s a great way to train young people in practical, high paying job skills like how to use and operate software and technical skills in media and graphics.” -Jody Rhodes, Neu-Life Executive Director

Putting it all together.

Wifi connection. "In order to support all of this new technology," says Rhodes, "Neu-Life had to up our own wifi. We also had to make sure that all of the youth here would have a strong wifi connection at home so that they would be able to join virtual programming." YWIC site coordinator, JaQuawn Seals, talked to youth and luckily, found that most had wifi or access to a smartphone hotspot.

Laptops. Initially, Neu-Life estimated that sourcing laptops would be a challenge based on experience with the Chromebooks youth had Digital Bridge Logo2received from MPS. How could we do this better? Neu-Life partnered with local nonprofit Digital Bridge to purchase business-grade refurbished laptops for our  virtual programs.

Key Staff

The studio creates more opportunities for Neu-Life staff. MishaSeigfried was promoted to studio manager, JaQuawn Seals became the broadcast lead announcer and all of the resilient YWIC staff have been flexible, adaptive and innovative in learning to teach online.

Special thanks to our very own tech-expert and studio connoisseur, Misha Seigfried, for leading the program launch.

In their own words: Why does Neu-Media Studio Matter?

“It matters because it helps keep the staff and youth employed, and gives us a way to continue to do prevention work and allows youth get the programs they need.” JaQuawn Seals, YWIC Site Coordinator

“To me it matters because of whats going on in the world. It allows us to keep in contact with people while still being in safe distance. And it teaches kids more technology.” Delores Moore, Operations Manager

“Its important because it gives the youth an opportunity to stay at neu life and an opportunity for staff to stay employed. Its a big deal!” Amunique McGee, Farmfork Coordinator

It’s important because we have the advantage now of virtual classes and we can still do events, keep Neu-Life going through the studio.” Ceejay Kendall, YWIC Lead Photography Teacher

Its important also to keep students safe, so that they wont be at risk for catching Covid.” Tamesha Roberson, YWIC Lead Art Teacher

The Neu-Media studio is important for Neu-Life because it enables us to develop innovative ways to offer programming; to provide direct service youth work in these trying times. Its also important because itll give kids with creative talent a foothold in media production that’s unavailable to them anywhere else. Were paying them for the opportunity toget their hands on tech and skills that won't cost them an armand a leg and to access lucrative careers.” Misha Seigfried, Neu-Media Studio Manager

 

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 Live Neu-Media Broacast of Annual Youth Summit

Building Bikes, Boats, Character, and Career Skills

 

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Youth Summit 2020

 

 

 

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Keynote Speaker Panel Features Neu-Life Alumni

Muhibb DyerA native Milwaukeean, Muhibb began counseling and mentoring youth through while still in high school. Muhibb has performed all over the U.S. as a spoken word artist and in 2002, was a finalist at the National Poetry Slam (the nation’s top spoken word competition). He co-founded Flood the Hood with Dreams and the I Will Not Die Young Campaign to bring the art of spoken word to inner city youth. He conducts conflict resolution workshops in Public School systems across the U.S. and has made numerous appearances as a motivational speaker and at graduation commencement ceremonies. His most recent appearance on the program Democracy Now has garnered support for continuation of his work with youth across the globe.

Khalil Coleman - A former Neu-Lifer, Coleman is a local community activist and protest organizer with over 15 years of experience working with and for youth. He's the founder of Changing Lives Through Literature and co-founder of Safe Zone Inititiative (SZI), a citywide voilence prevention/intervention program. He is an author and nationally recognized thought leader who has been featured on PBS News Hour, Black in Milwaukee (2016).

Jeremy Triblett - Jeremy began his career as a Public Ally with Urban Underground, an after-school program that develops teen leadership skills through civic engagement. He is currently the Public Policy Institutue's Training and Technical Assistance Coordinator and the Mental Health and Wellness Coordinator for MCSAPJeremy combines his experience in project coordination, collective impact strategies, professional development training, and organizational development to advance the work of youth- and family-serving organizations.

Chanda Harris -  Chanda is a Milwaukee native and one of the “original” Neu-life kids. Her community work started at an early age through Neu-life with civic engagement and community service events. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee with a degree in business and is currently works as Business Engagement Director for Neu-life and Residential Living Services. Outside of her corporate career, Chanda is an artist that goes by the stage name of Chae Harris. She is part of a collective that started Art therapy, a platform for new and established local artist to share a stage and promote each other.

Kwabena Antoine Dixon -  Kwabena is award winning author, motivational speaker and nationality recognized spoken word artist. Born and raised on Chicago’s west side (known in the 80’s as the gangbang capital of the world) Kwabena lost his father to street violence at the age of 11. He moved to Milwaukee to escape a lifestyle that many of his closest friends and family had fallen prey to. He found his voice in art. A graduate of both Malcom X College and Columbia College Chicago, Kwabena has dedicated his life’s work to inspiring not just a generation, but a movement.


 

 

Neu-Life Teens Learn Real-World Financial Skills with Virtual Investing Game.

By Britta Jerdee

stock market game logoSay the words 'Stock Market' to many adults and you may as well be speaking another language. The prospect of risk and money in the same sentence can be a scary proposition.


But research shows that teens who have been taught to invest open themselves up to a "wealth" of opportunities.

 

From June 15 to August 21, 2020, five Neu-life teens participated in a first-of-its-kind pilot program alongside six other Milwaukee organizations. The program, called Stock Market Game, gave teens the education and opportunity to invest a fictitious $100,000 on the EconomicsWisconsin Stock Market Game platform. Winning team members received a very real $200 each for 1st place; $100 each for 2nd place and $50 each for 3rd at the end of the game . 
 
Teens participated in weekly team meetings, educational workgroups and digital orientations with various "office hours" presenters from across the country. After the team felt comfortable in their knowledge and ability to successfully manage their investment portfolio, they decided how to invest their $100,000 through simulated, real-time stock transactions. 

Teens who learn the Stock Market Game have a unique opportunity to learn how to invest in themselves, grow generational wealth and economic prosperity. It teaches them to discover their personal risk tolerance, learn investment strategies and develop a sense of their own investment aspirations. All the while, they are developing useful life skills -   team work, gaining responsibility in their roles, and collaborating with an ever expanding network. The positive outcomes of financial education can be absolutely transformative, expanding beyond the student and into their communities.

Why Should Teens Learn About the Stock Market?

Empowering young people with the knowledge and skills needed for investing along with exposure to career opportunities in Stock Marketthe financial industry can set them on a path to financial health and wealth. The SIFMA Stock Market Game has a long history of providing students with a platform to research, find and select investments for their portfolio in a classroom setting. Research demonstrates that the game improves financial literacy.

“The Stock Market Game has a long and successful history as an educational tool within the classroom framework,”says Bob Glowacki of Economics Wisconsin. “The significant innovation we are trying here is to see if the game can also be implemented effectively through community based organizations. If so, this will open up an entirely new and accessible way to bring early education in investing to more urban youth.”

Confronting Economic Inequities

The TIAA Institute released a study measuring financial literacy among racial groups. Key findings show that personal finance knowledge among African American adults lags that of Whites and that there is a strong link between financial literacy and financial wellness. Those who are more financially literate are more likely to plan and save for retirement, to have non-retirement savings and to better manage debt.

financial wellness    

 

Watch the Stock Market Game Capstone Presentations and Awards Ceremony - Live on Facebook

Click here >> Facebook Live Broadcast

Program Partners


Participating Organizations:
Journey House, Milwaukee School of Excellence, Neighborhood House, Peak Initiative, Running Rebels, MKE Fellows 
  
Contributors
Asset Builders, United Way consultant, Jim Bower, Collective Impact
 
Stock Market Game Pilot planning committee:
Bob Glowacki, Julie Glaunert and Mark Schug
 
Collective Impact and Stock Market Game Community Liaisons:
Darryl Davidson – Director of Community Engagement
TeAngelo Cargile Jr. – Office of Violence Prevention
Shannon Reed and Whitney Bingham, Jeremy Simon
 
“Office Hours” Presenters:
Eric Utrie, Mark Schug, Na’il Diggs, Better Investing, Gregory Webb, Joe Knight, Ionnie McNeill, Dr. Terrance Green, Angela Stenklyft, Paige Radke 
 
Sponsors:
A special thank you to United Way and the City of Milwaukee
Game platform made possible by the SIMFA Foundation

To learn more about the wide range of school and community-based programs and resources on personal finance, wealth-building and economics, visit our partners’ websites:  

EconomicsWisconsin: www.ewwcee.org  
Asset Builders: www.assetbuilders.org
United Way: www.unitedwaygmwc.org 

 

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Brown Street Youth Explore Fabric and Textiles With Local Artists

Brown St pic 2Experiential learning is the foundation of Neu-Life's arts education model, enabling youth of all ages, backgrounds and skill levels to participate in the arts. A popular recurring program is Textile Arts - including dyeing, screenprinting, weaving, clothing construction with sewing machines and more. More than just popular and fun, textile arts  are accessible, practical, process-driven and common all over the world. They're  part of our collective history and can be a  vital expression of the thoughts and feelings of today's youth.

 

Meet Artist Darla Honeycutt

Honeycutt (or Miss Darla, as she is called at Neu-Life) is a Milwaukee native with 8 years of Fashion Design experience specializing in denim fashions. Her brand - Dee Denim - offers customized denim apparel to customers in the U.S., the United Kingdom and Brazil. Darla took Dee Denim to the playground to teach skills like stonewashing and tie dyeing,  and eventually created a textile arts class for youth called FashioNation. Check out Honeycutt's class offerings at FashioNation!

NL: How long have you been doing Fashion Club

DH: I have been operating FashioNation, formerly known as Fashion Club since 2015.

NL: What has been your favorite fashion project so far?

DH: My favorite fashion project thus far has been our Denim Fashion Design workshops. Seeing our participants’ eyes light up after transforming their denim apparel from start to finish has been quite a reward. Especially because I began my fashion career designing and selling my own denim apparel. Our participants have learned how to distress, stonewash, embellish and much more since experiencing FashioNation.

NL: How do you stay inspired as a creator?

DH: I stay inspired as a creator by knowing that our youth participants can and have taken what they’ve learned with FashioNation and applying it at home for the use of hobby and/or entrepreneurship!

NL: How has fashion and art positively impacted you?

DH: Fashion and art has always been an inspiration for me but they continue to motivate me to see the beauty in everything around me.

 

 
Meet Artist Pamela Graham

Pick 1 GTJ siteMiss Graham has been a long-time partner in providing textile arts at Neu-Life.  Graham believes that the arts help children explore their natural given talents and exposes them to their creative side, developing skills along the way that they may be able to utilize in the future. "My most memorable moment from this summer was creating t-shirts with the little ones," says Graham. "It gave them a connection to what was going on in the city and allowed them to be a part of the peaceful protesting in their own way."

*Youth pictured with tshirts made with Miss Graham and backpacks donated by long time partner, Zonta Club of Milwaukee.

 

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16th Annual Pay It Forward Serves Near North Side Residents

Pay it ForwardEach summer, Neu-Life teens from the Youth Work Innovation Center (YWIC) on North Avenue offer a helping hand to neighborhood residents. They tackle yard work, painting and light repairs for those who may not be able to do the work themselves. 

While Milwaukee nonprofits grappled over the summer with a pandemic that forced distance between them and those they serve, Neu-Life believed its annual youth-led service event, Pay It Forward, was still possible and very much needed - perhaps more than ever. 

Volunteering and service - more important than ever during a crisis.

Pandemic or not, the neighborhood around Neu-Life's YWIC site on North Avenue still looked forward to and relied on the youth-led Pay It Forward service day to clean up trash and make minor repairs and improvement to homes. In its 16th year, the community engagement and service event has helped Neu-Life build strong relationships within the neighborhood. With a few extra precautions for COVID safety, the event continued to be a success.

Physically distanced, socially connected. Following guidelines for safety.

Information collected by the CDC for April - July 2020 indicates that for many young adults, social distancing and lack of peer support comes at a high cost to mental health. For Neu-Life youth who may already experience setbacks, being cutoff from the Neu-Life family and support system could make things even more difficult.

To make attending program in-person at Neu-Life as safe as possible,  new guidelines were implemented - and they were things that many of us were doing already like washing our hands, physical distancing and staying home when sick. Additionally, Neu-Life required masks and recorded body temperature of every student and staff upon arrival. Even during a normal summer, Neu-Life programming is all about being outdoors and getting lots of physical activity and fresh air with programs like Wellness Wednesday and FarmFork Gardening.

Neu-Life felt very strongly that Pay It Forward could still happen with a little extra planning and a few new rules.  Keeping distance and wearing masks were a must, which meant fewer high fives and fist bumps than in years past. Sharing of equipment was minimized and teens worked in small groups.

Community service has a powerful impact on teens.

Studies show that youth who volunteer are less likely to become involved in at-risk behaviors such as drinking alcohol and skipping school compared with those who do not. Volunteerism also positively impacts other youth social and behavioral issues like teen pregnancy, dropout, substance abuse and violence.

Neu-Life's mission is to instill in youth the skills to make better life choices, and volunteerism plays an important role in that strategy. Neu-Life teens collaborate on preparation, planning and action, and also reflect on the impact of Pay It Forward: what did they do and learn, what difference did it make in the community and themselves, and what comes next? All important lifeskills that Neu-Life teens carry forward into other areas of their lives.

*Very special thanks to Greater Milwaukee Foundation for supporting the 2020 Annual Pay It Forward event.*

 

Learn More about YWIC Programs for Teens.

YWIC offers youth year-long access to prevention programs; a one-on-one preventative case manager (called a Student Advocate) who helps track and coach toward academic, career and life goals; project based work groups; paid work experiences; and access to college and career readiness. All of this is done in a caring and supportive environment with very little turnover in staff or program participants, creating a family-like envirnoment where youth flourish.  

Learn more >> Programs offered at YWIC

 

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More Pay It Forward Photos on Facebook.

Don't hesitate to S-M-A-S-H that LIKE button! "Liking" and "following" Neu-Life social accounts really does help us rank higher,  reach more people, and share the message about the work we're doing with youth. It doesn't cost you a thing and it's a huge help to us! If you aren't yet a follower, take a few minutes to join our community online.

See Photo Album >> Neu-Life on Facebook

 

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Welcome to our #DonorAppreciation post! In the spirit of giving thanks - Neu life wants to take a moment to publicly showcase our donors and say thank you for supporting us! Many of our programs would not be possible without generous donations from Zonta Club of Milwaukee, a long time, donor, supporter, and partner.  

In this post, you will get to know a little bit about why Zonta is a rockstar in our community, how they have supported us throughout the years and ways to join forces with Zonta Club of Milwaukee and Neu-Life. Here’s to you, Zonta!  

Read more to find out about what Zonta does and why their support means the world to us. 

What is Zonta Club?

A little background: The Zonta Club of Milwaukee is a non-profit organization that has specialized in empowering women for over 90 years. As advocates for women, Zontians have been committed to raising funds to allocate resources to women in the community.

Zonta focuses on prevention of violence against women but they don’t stop there! They advocate, provide hands on services and raise funds for scholarships to help survivors of domestic violence.  

In an environment safe from violence, women have the opportunity to thrive. Zonta's work makes education, mentoring and financial assistance services accessible, helping women achieve in their chosen fields. 

Click here to find out more about Zonta Club of Milwaukee.

Why is Zonta Important to us? 

Zonta’s impact on Neu-Life’s youth began nearly a decade ago. Over the years, our collaborations have evolved from sponsoring the construction of our art room. Most recently, Zonta’s involvement has reached Neu-STEPPThe Back to School Career Fair and The Holiday Season for Neu-Life Youth

But, what does this really mean for Neu-Life? 

Zonta is responsible for the development of Neu-STEPP, Neu-Life's Sex Trafficking Education and Prevention Programs. 

Zonta’s donations are integral to the development and growth of Neu-STEPP. At the beginning of the year, we collaborated with Zonta to outline goals for creating education that focuses on emphasizing healthy relationships to support community members in identifying early warning signs of sex trafficking. Since then, we completed three pilot programs and incorporated feedback from program participants and the community to refine the program.

artreach

 

None of this would be possible without Zonta. We’re happy to announce that with their support, we have redesigned Neu-STEPP and are starting revisions to print the official toolkit.

Backpacks and Christmas gifts are more than just free stuff. Zonta provides relief to families during the most financially stressful times of the year. 


“We are paying it forward by getting involved with the community. It doesn’t just impact youth, it impacts Neu-Life itself because we play a positive role in the community by packing and giving out backpacks. It helps the youth to prepare for a successful start to the school year and helps parents who might not have their own finances for school supplies. Each year, we are able to put smiles on youth faces. Shout out to miss Donna for allowing us to be a part of their success.” 

-Guy Irving, Assistant Site Coordinator. 

 “Gift giveaways help provide gifts for 50-75 youth. The impact of that is-some of those youth wouldn’t have been given a gift if it wasn’t for Zonta. They help make Christmas possible for young people who may not have otherwise received a gift. This relieves pressure from families during a stressful time.” 

-JaQuawn Seals, Site coordinator


holiday party

 

This is our opportunity to shout 'Thank You' from the mountain tops, from all of us here at Neu-Life. Zonta, you continue to amaze us with your generous donations, support, and partnership.  

Without you, we wouldn’t be able to support the families in our community, or provide education to keep young people safe from violence.  

We wouldn’t be able to give young people the chance to start out their school year with brand-new backpack stuffed with school supplies, or brighten their holiday season with Christmas gifts.

 

Get Involved

Do you want to brighten the holiday season for young people? Check out our Annual Gift Drive registry and donate gifts this holiday season!  

1. What would you name the autobiography of your life?Copy of bike

“Is this real life?”

2. If you could learn to do anything, what would it be?

Everything, I love to learn!

3. If you won the lottery, what is the first thing you would do?

Invest half and travel

4. When you have 30 minutes of free-time, how do you pass the time?

Relaxing!

5. If you could be any fictional character, who would you choose?

Gandalf

6. What was the last experience that made you a stronger person?

Public Allies

7. What is something you learned at Neu-Life in the last week?

I learned the terms “Port and Starboard.

8. What’s your favorite indoor/outdoor activity?

Riding my bicycle or hiking.

9. What chore do you absolutely hate doing?

The dishes!

10. If you could meet anyone, living or dead, who would you meet?

There are too many people to choose.

11. Have you ever had something happen to you that you thought was bad but it turned out to be for the best?
I’ve learned something from every misstep I’ve taken.

12. At what age did you become an adult?

47 (I’m 26)

13. What three traits define you?

Empathy, organization & pensive.

14. Ten years ago, who did you think you would be now?

I thought I would be married and a mom.

15. What’s the coolest (or most important) trend you see today with youth?

That they love themselves.

16. What would you do (for a career) if you weren’t doing this?

I would probably be WWOOFing.

17. What advice do you have for kids who are struggling in school?

Your teachers want to help you, ask them for help.

18. What would you most like to tell yourself at age 13?

You don’t have anything to prove to anyone!

19. How do you define success?

If I am happy and proud.

20. What is your favorite thing about working at Neulife?

Coming back after the weekend and seeing the young people smile.


On July 22nd, five teens and staff from Neu-Life led a group of students from other sites on a tour of black-owned businesses in Milwaukee. The route, itinerary and information for the experience was developed throughout spring and summer by youth tour leaders at the YWIC, with support from experienced tour guide, Adam Carr. They used what they knew as a foundation and built upon it through experiences, interviews and research — even the theme for the tour was generated during a field trip.

The final tour route includes stops at Alice’s Garden, Bronzeville Collective MKE, Sherman Phoenix and an original interactive activity that illustrates cooperative economics. Moving forward, we’re hoping to deliver the tour to more youth, as well as adult groups. Carr has been in conversation with Cross Lutheran about the potential of adapting the tour for their senior group, which would also include opportunities for intergenerational dialogue.

An aspirational goal is turning the tour into a small business, potentially attached to other developments/organizations in the neighborhood. This could be a source of income for Neu-Life youth, as well as an authentic, deep-rooted way for interested folks to learn about the neighborhood

“Working with Neu-Life youth and young adults was a wonderful experience," says Carr. "The whole process was propelled by their curiosity and insights, which pushed me to think deeper and engage with questions that pushed my limits." During the tour, Carr said exactly zero words, allowing the youth to lead the entire tour. "They rose to the occasion and offered a beautiful learning experience within their own community."


Physical activity is critical for youth to develop positive behaviors and grow into self-sufficient adults. That is why Wednesdays at Neu-Life are WELLNESS Wednesdays, and feature activities that move the body, provide opportunities for problem-solving, teamwork, and improve the overall wellbeing of our kids. We're fortunate to be located so near to Johnsons Park, one of the few public green spaces in the Lindsay Heights neighborhood, and are happy to say that the park gets used every week by our kids!


Farmfork’s production and teaching gardens serve to educate our kids as well as provide home-grown produce for the culinary activities of the program. Spring through fall, outdoor gardening activities combine overlapping themes of cultivating the garden, the self and the community, while also connecting to core science, social studies, math, and language arts where appropriate.

The positive impact of youth gardening programs is well documented. For example, this study highlighted how community gardening led to both increased know-how and a greater belief in one’s own ability to perform a task. (Grier, 2014). And this gardening program in Los Angeles improved willingness to eat fruits and vegetables in Latino youth (Gatto, Ventura, Cook, Gyllenhammer, & Davis, 2012). 

Neu-life has been using gardening as a way to connect connect kids to nature and improve their physical health for over 15 years. They learn important life lessons through the responsibility and hard work required to keep the garden thriving. Because our gardens are located in community spaces, our gardening program often creates opportunites to explore history, cultural heritage, and the broader social determinants of health impacting our neighbors. Our teaching garden located in Alice's Garden, for example, creates a window into learning about Wisconsin’s Underground Railroad.

You can read more about Neu-Life's relationship with Alice's Garden here.

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A significant portion of Farmfork's funding comes directly from individuals in our community! Your support each year is important to growing the program. Giving to Farmfork is a direct way for you to support urban gardening and it's many benefits to the community. In 2018 alone, over 1,000 kids participated in Farmfork.

 

 

Farmfork Through the Years

 

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